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Why Airline Perks Are So Disappointing | CNBC Marathon
45:11
CNBC

Why Airline Perks Are So Disappointing | CNBC Marathon

CNBC Marathon explores the business of airline amenities and how airlines are working to improve them. Over the past couple of years, airlines and credit card companies like American, United, Chase and Capital One are investing millions into expanding their airport lounge networks for customers. However, lounges have become so popular that some face overcrowding, and companies like Delta are making it harder to get airline status. Airlines have been spending big to add more space and comfort to seats on board planes. According to AeroDynamic advisory, airplane seats were a $2.6 billion dollar market globally in 2022, almost half of $6.2 aircraft interiors market. U.S. airlines like American, Delta and United have been adding more premium seats to their fleets. Delta estimates its premium revenue will be 35% of total revenue this year compared to 24% in 2014. Food service on domestic airlines has drastically changed in recent years. Nearly 3 million passengers fly every day in the U.S. Post pandemic, airlines have seen an increase in passengers buying up to premium seats - putting pressure on airlines to offer better food options and more of them. Airplane Wi-Fi has been around for decades but its reliability and speeds can vary widely depending on the airline, the route and the type and age of the aircraft. American Airlines, United and other U.S. airlines have been updating their fleets to provide better Wi-Fi. Delta has spent over $1 billion retrofitting its planes to bring free wifi to its customers. Chapters: 00:00 Introduction 00:46 Why It's Becoming Harder To Get Into Airport Lounges (Published October 2023) 11:10 Why Airplane Seats Are Getting Big And Fancier Again (Published August 2023) 24:24 How American Airlines Makes 15,000 Meals A Day (Published September 2023) 32:48 Why Wi-Fi On Airplanes Is So Bad (Published July 2023) » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Want to land your dream job in 2024? Take CNBC’s new online course How to Ace Your Job Interview to learn what hiring managers are really looking for: https://cnb.cx/4871WwH Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: https://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC on Threads: https://cnb.cx/threads Follow CNBC News on X: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC #CNBC Why Airline Perks Are So Disappointing | CNBC Marathon
How Hyundai Became The Third Largest Automaker In The World
15:23
CNBC

How Hyundai Became The Third Largest Automaker In The World

Hyundai Motor Group is the 3rd largest automaker in the world by volume. In the 1990s, it suffered low sales and a reputation for low quality. Now its three auto brands - Hyundai, Kia and Genesis - are nipping at the heels of well established competitors, and winning award after award. While Tesla still dominates the EV industry, Hyundai and Kia are inching closer. But the company also wants to revolutionize manufacturing, invest in robotics, autonomous driving and flying taxis, ambitions that many rivals have abandoned. But the company has also faced setbacks: a plague of thefts, millions of vehicles at risk of catching fire, a looming union push and a snub from the U.S. government. Chapters: 01:42 Title card - How Hyundai became the third largest automaker 02:22 Chapter 1 - A formidable competitor 4:13 Chapter 2 - A bleaker past 06:10 Chapter 3 - Transformation 08:48 Chapter 4 - Challenges and future Producer: Robert Ferris Editor: Darren Geeter Animation: Christina Locopo Camera: Andrew Evers, Sydney Boyo Senior Managing Producer: Tala Hadavi Additional footage: Getty Images, Hyundai Motor Company, Tesla, Toyota, Kia » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Want to land your dream job in 2024? Take CNBC’s new online course How to Ace Your Job Interview to learn what hiring managers are really looking for: https://cnb.cx/4871WwH Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: https://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC on Threads: https://cnb.cx/threads Follow CNBC News on X: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC #CNBC How Hyundai Became The Third Largest Automaker In The World
Will The Immigration Crisis Bankrupt U.S. Cities?
13:10
CNBC

Will The Immigration Crisis Bankrupt U.S. Cities?

The ongoing migrant crisis is unprecedented, both in scale and the impact it’s had beyond the border states to cities located deep within the country. Major cities like New York, Denver, and Chicago are finding themselves under extreme financial pressure, exacerbated by the lack of federal funding or assistance. So just how long can cities withstand the recent surge of migrants and what do they need to end the crisis? Chapters: 01:01 Fiscal Crisis 04:21 Buses from the South 09:14 Repercussions Producer: Juhohn Lee Editor: Nora Rappaport Animations: Jason Reginato Supervising Producer: Lindsey Jacobson Additional Footage: Getty Images » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Want to land your dream job in 2024? Take CNBC’s new online course How to Ace Your Job Interview to learn what hiring managers are really looking for: https://cnb.cx/4871WwH Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: https://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC on Threads: https://cnb.cx/threads Follow CNBC News on X: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC #CNBC Will The Immigration Crisis Bankrupt U.S. Cities?
Why Widespread Tech Layoffs Keep Happening Despite A Strong U.S. Economy
12:18
CNBC

Why Widespread Tech Layoffs Keep Happening Despite A Strong U.S. Economy

The tech sector is having a big 2024. Nvidia just crushed earnings expectations. The AI boom remains in full swing. The tech-heavy Nasdaq index is up more than 8 percent year-to-date. The U.S. economy is also doing surprisingly well, adding 353,000 jobs in January, well ahead of economists' forecasts. Hotter-than-expected inflation data may also keep the Fed from cutting rates as soon as the market expects, a sign that the economy remains strong enough to support higher interest rates for longer.It's a different story for tech workers, though. "The layoffs to the start of 2024 signal a dramatic shift in the tech industry," said Jeff Shulman, professor at the University of Washington's Foster School of Business. "We're going to continue to see layoffs happen as the future of work has changed, as the future of technology has changed, and as investors appetite for risk and growth versus profitability has dramatically changed as well." The number of tech sector layoffs in 2024 has been outpacing the number of terminations in 2023. So far, about 42,324 tech employees were let go in 2024, according to Layoffs.fyi, which tracks layoffs in the tech industry. That averages out to more than 780 layoffs each day in 2024. In 2023, nearly 263,000 tech employees got laid off, averaging about 720 firings each day that year. There are several factors behind the churn. Artificial intelligence is at the forefront. Companies need to free up cash to invest in the chips and servers that power the AI models behind these new technologies. There's also the stock market effect. Companies that conducted layoffs haven't been punished for it, either by investors or on their bottom lines. Watch the video above to find out more about why tech workers may be poised to endure another rough year of layoffs, and why the surprising strength of the U.S. economy may not be coming to their rescue. Chapters: 0:00 — Intro 2:26 — Hiring and firing 4:24 — The AI effect 7:15 — The end of cushy tech jobs? 9:50 — What’s next? Produced by Anuz Thapa Edited by Michael Hoyt Narration by Jordan Smith Graphics by Jason Reginato and Christina Locopo Supervising Producer Jeff Morganteen » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Want to land your dream job in 2024? Take CNBC’s new online course How to Ace Your Job Interview to learn what hiring managers are really looking for: https://cnb.cx/4871WwH Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: https://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC on Threads: https://cnb.cx/threads Follow CNBC News on X: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC #CNBC Why Widespread Tech Layoffs Keep Happening Despite A Strong U.S. Economy
How Nescafé Instant Coffee Is Made
07:35
CNBC

How Nescafé Instant Coffee Is Made

With annual sales of $11.6 billion as of December 2023, Nescafé is Swiss-based food giant Nestlé’s largest coffee segment. Sold in over 180 countries, one in seven cups of coffee consumed worldwide is a Nescafé. Globally about 3 billion cups of coffee are consumed each day and that number is expected to rise. To keep up with demand Nescafé works with over 100,000 farmers and buys more than 13 million bags of green coffee annually. It also has two dozen factories globally. But producers are facing a number of challenges including fluctuating coffee prices and higher labor costs . So how is Nescafé instant produced? CNBC traveled to Vietnam to get a behind the scenes look at Nestle’s operation to find out. Chapters: 0:00-1:41 Intro 1:42-4:37 Chapter 1 Harvesting coffee 4:38-7:31 Chapter 2 Roasting beans Produced by: Shawn Baldwin Edited by: Marc Ganley Animation: Jason Reginato, Mallory Brangan Supervising Producer: Jeniece Pettitt Camera: Peter Scheid Translation: Tri Le Tran Additional Footage: Getty Images » Subscribe to CNBC: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBC » Subscribe to CNBC TV: https://cnb.cx/SubscribeCNBCtelevision About CNBC: From 'Wall Street' to 'Main Street' to award winning original documentaries and Reality TV series, CNBC has you covered. Experience special sneak peeks of your favorite shows, exclusive video and more. Want to land your dream job in 2024? Take CNBC’s new online course How to Ace Your Job Interview to learn what hiring managers are really looking for: https://cnb.cx/4871WwH Connect with CNBC News Online Get the latest news: https://www.cnbc.com/ Follow CNBC on LinkedIn: https://cnb.cx/LinkedInCNBC Follow CNBC News on Facebook: https://cnb.cx/LikeCNBC Follow CNBC News on X: https://cnb.cx/FollowCNBC Follow CNBC News on Instagram: https://cnb.cx/InstagramCNBC #CNBC How Nescafé Instant Coffee Is Made
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